Monthly Archives: March 2010
Alissa Wilkinson  |  March 29, 2010  |  Arts, Media, Tech

  I’m late to the party, as usual, but I just discovered the Atlantic Wire’s “Media Diet” feature this week. And all I have to say is this: HOW COOL IS THAT? No, I have more. It’s astounding how much some of these people read. I am considered a manic reader among my small circles, but I can’t hold a candle to these folks—or most … MORE »

Christina Crook  |  March 25, 2010  |  Arts

  Tired of Tchaikovsky? (I know, I know, as if that is possible.) Consider CBC Radio 3, a radio station that consists of two parts devoted to Canadian arts and music: a radio service which is available on Sirius Satellite Radio and streaming audio, and several daily and weekly podcasts from CBCRadio3.com, the full-screen online magazine profiling Canadian music, literature and visual arts. The audio … MORE »

Milton Friesen  |  March 19, 2010  |  Innovation, Tech

  Christina’s post on web thinkers coincided with with this Sir Ken Robinson video on collaboration from Toronto’s Artscape. You can see the trimmed 6 minute video here. The type of thinking, our idea orientation, our posture of engagement, whatever you want to call it, makes an enormous difference in our relative ability to learn, grow and undertake valuable projects together. Do we think we … MORE »

Christina Crook  |  March 18, 2010  |  Innovation, Tech

  One of my ‘hats,’ as a media relations instructor, requires that I keep up on the wonderful world of social media. I blog (obviously) but beyond that I am a bit of a luddite. So, to stay ahead of the curve, I lean heavily on web-savvy colleagues tied to iPhones. One organization I follow closely, however, is Biro Creative—a Vancouver-based web agency and the … MORE »

Alissa Wilkinson  |  March 15, 2010  |  Literature

Over at Living Jubilee today, I wrote a little bit about Marilyn Chandler McEntyre’s book Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies. I think it bears repeating over here as well, because I think this book is important to the “public square” conversation we’re always having at Cardus. One of McEntyre’s points is that tired cliches and hyperbole are slowly taking over our public … MORE »

Milton Friesen  |  March 12, 2010  |  Innovation

Today, we are a mostly impatient lot. We have trouble waiting five minutes for a coffee and fume if a flight is late. It is difficult to imagine that we might have to wait decades for something. In the world of ideas, things don’t always move quickly. Most of us can’t persist in developing a line of inquiry for weeks and months, never mind years … MORE »

Christina Crook  |  March 11, 2010  |  Arts, Literature

  This week, spurred by my participation in a local poetry workshop, I pulled a back issue of Room of One’s Own, the Canadian feminist literary journal, off the shelf. It served as a reminder that truth often arrives in the simplest of pictures, the fewest of words. Such as those of Ann Scowcroft: iv. the wind I stand next to him. He wears patched … MORE »

Alissa Wilkinson  |  March 7, 2010  |  Literature

Over at Living Jubilee today, I wrote a little bit about Marilyn Chandler McEntyre’s book Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies. I think it bears repeating over here as well, because I think this book is important to the “public square” conversation we’re always having at Cardus. One of McEntyre’s points is that tired cliches and hyperbole are slowly taking over our public … MORE »

Milton Friesen  |  March 5, 2010  |  Business, Cities, Death

  Fast Company started this line of inquiry for me with a piece they published on dead malls. They featured Dixie Square Mall, pictured above from the website DeadMalls.com. Another one is El Con Mall. There are many, many more. Pop culture commentators and analysts talk about malls as our ritual religious gathering places, the temples of western consumerism. For the last ten years, Brian … MORE »

Christina Crook  |  March 4, 2010  |  Literature, Vocation

  As the Globe reports, it seems people are still interested in writing, and in what writers have to say about it. “Inspired by the British paperback publication of Elmore Leonard’s 10 Rules of Writing, the Guardian newspaper asked a selection of fiction writers for their rules, and got a surprisingly wide range of responses.” The answers, which have gone viral, appear now on the … MORE »