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Summer 2017 | Volume 35, Issue 2

Rethinking Civil Religion

In this issue we want to suggest there are expressions of civil religion that deserve serious consideration because, as implausible as it might seem, civil religion is an irreplaceable moral source of civil society. And conversely, the biblical vision of our human calling to tend the earth and love our neighbours—a calling that is renewed by the gospel, not superseded—propels us into social concern for the societies in which we find ourselves.

11 Articles In this Issue
02
Editorial: Reconsidering "Civil Religion" by James K.A. Smith

What if religious communities are the best hope for renewing liberal democracy?

06
World View by James K.A. Smith

An annotated reading of your world.

11
Headquarters: Work & Economics by Brian Dijkema

Updates from Cardus on the renewal of North America's social architecture.

12
The Headscarf: Islam's Gift to Western Democracy by Matthew Kaemingk

Learning to welcome Islam is a way to relearn what democracy is about.

20
Sacred Heritage, Sacred History by Eric Miller

As Canada approaches its sesquicentennial, an American historian recalls lessons learned at their bicentennial.

28
Filth Therapy: A Cunning Word by Alan Jacobs

A question in the novels of Robertson Davies: What ways of Wisdom have been discarded by modern Knowledge?

37
Can States Be Christian? by Jonathan Chaplin, Brian Dijkema

Political philosopher Jonathan Chaplin helps us think about civil religion by making things more complicated.

48
L'Etat, C'Est Toi by Andrew Bennett, Brian Dijkema

Why proclaiming Christ as King provides the basis for religious freedom for those who don't.

54
Do We Need a Foreign Policy Pope? by Robert Joustra

The trouble with trying to discern orthodoxy from heresy in civil religion.

58
A Form of Godliness by Susan Wise Bauer

Why civil religion won't save us from religious nationalism or radical secularism.

64
The Commons: Cultivate Your Calling by Alicia Flatt

A word of advice to recent graduates.

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