Toward a Healthy Society
 
Table of Contents
Table of Contents

    Child Care by the Numbers-Prince Edward Island

    Child care is the care of a child, no matter who provides that care. Families have diverse care needs and rely on a variety of forms of care to meet those needs. Public policy best serves families when it offers flexibility and choice. Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of parents in Prince Edward Island and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

    Topics: Family, Daycare, Children

    The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

    Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of parents in PEI and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

    • Of PEI children under age six, about 34 percent are in parental care only.1
    • About 3 percent of PEI children under age six are in parental care because the parent could not find another option.2
    • The majority of PEI children under age six will receive no benefit from funds designated for centre-based spaces.
    • Of all PEI children under age six (those in non-parental child care and those who are not), about 40 percent are in centre-based care or preschool.3

    Prince Edward Island should take a neutral, evidence-based approach and respect the diversity of care that parents use.