Our Research

Clear
Should the federal government introduce a new child-care model?
Should the federal government introduce a new child-care model?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, Should the federal government introduce a new child-care model? 

Cash benefits for families and a national daycare system?
Cash benefits for families and a national daycare system?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, can we have both cash benefits for families and a national daycare system?

Will a “universal” early-learning and child-care system get mothers back to work?
Will a “universal” early-learning and child-care system get mothers back to work?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, will a “universal” early-learning and child-care system get mothers back to waged work after the pandemic? 

Do those who oppose a national daycare system also oppose working mothers?
Do those who oppose a national daycare system also oppose working mothers?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, do those who oppose a national daycare system also oppose working mothers? 

Does Nobel Prize–winning economist James Heckman support universal daycare?
Does Nobel Prize–winning economist James Heckman support universal daycare?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? Another question that begs to be answered is if Nobel Prize–winning economist James Heckman supports universal daycare? 

Do we have a credible cost estimate for a national, high-quality universal daycare system?
Do we have a credible cost estimate for a national, high-quality universal daycare system?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, do we have a credible cost estimate for a national, high-quality universal daycare system?  

Would spending 1 percent of GDP on child care achieve a national, high-quality daycare system?
Would spending 1 percent of GDP on child care achieve a national, high-quality daycare system?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, would spending 1 percent of GDP on child care achieve a national, high-quality daycare system?

Is there a shortage of child care in Canada?
Is there a shortage of child care in Canada?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, is there a shortage of child care in Canada? 

Child Care by the Numbers: Alberta
Child Care by the Numbers: Alberta
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of Alberta parents and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Child Care by the Numbers - British Columbia
Child Care by the Numbers - British Columbia
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of BC parents and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Childcare by the Numbers - Manitoba
Childcare by the Numbers - Manitoba
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of parents in Manitoba and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Child Care by the Numbers-Saskatchewan
Child Care by the Numbers-Saskatchewan
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of parents in Saskatchewan and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Child Care by the Numbers-Prince Edward Island
Child Care by the Numbers-Prince Edward Island
2021-01-28T08:00:00

Child care is the care of a child, no matter who provides that care. Families have diverse care needs and rely on a variety of forms of care to meet those needs. Public policy best serves families when it offers flexibility and choice. Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of parents in Prince Edward Island and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Child Care by the Numbers - Ontario
Child Care by the Numbers - Ontario
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of parents in Ontario and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Child Care by the Numbers - Newfoundland & Labrador
Child Care by the Numbers - Newfoundland & Labrador
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of parents in Newfoundland and Labrador and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Child Care by the Numbers - Nova Scotia
Child Care by the Numbers - Nova Scotia
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of Nova Scotia parents and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Child Care by the Numbers - New Brunswick
Child Care by the Numbers - New Brunswick
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of New Brunswick parents and their reasons for the type of care they choose.



Our Time - Project at Vanier Centre for Women
Our Time - Project at Vanier Centre for Women
2021-01-22T11:00:00

The OUR TIME project is a service initiative by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints volunteering at the Vanier Centre for Women, a correctional facility in Milton, Ontario. Through OUR TIME, the women incarcerated at Vanier have the opportunity to record themselves reading to their children, giving them a chance to hear their mothers’ voices while they are apart.

Union Gospel Mission: Case Studies in Faith-Based Social Service
Union Gospel Mission: Case Studies in Faith-Based Social Service
2021-01-12T09:00:00

Union Gospel Mission (UGM) ministers to people experiencing homelessness, poverty, and addiction throughout Metro Vancouver and Mission, British Columbia. Throughout its eighty-year history, Union Gospel Mission’s work has been rooted in and motived by its Christian faith. The organization meets immediate needs in the region with emergency shelter, chaplaincy services, and meals.

Fuelling Canada's Middle Class
Fuelling Canada's Middle Class
2020-12-02T14:36:20

How can policy-makers ensure that the burden of climate action is broadly distributed, and not disproportionately affecting low- and mid-skilled workers? This paper argues that the focus should be on lowering the emission intensity of the sector rather than abandoning resource development altogether.

Cardus Submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on the Status of Women
Cardus Submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on the Status of Women
2020-11-19T13:00:00

Solutions for families both during and after the pandemic.

Matthew House: Case Studies in Faith-Based Social Service
Matthew House: Case Studies in Faith-Based Social Service
2020-11-10T15:39:02

Matthew House Ottawa provides services to refugee claimants, offering them a temporary place to live in Ottawa, Ontario, and access to an established support network as they start their new life in Canada.

Broad Support for MAiD in Canada Has Caveats and Concerns
Broad Support for MAiD in Canada Has Caveats and Concerns
2020-11-10T05:55:00

The story of Canadian attitudes toward medical assistance in dying (MAiD), or doctor-assisted suicide, is a complex one. It is clear that general support for MAiD has increased since it has become legal, but for most Canadians, many caveats accompany their support. This public opinion survey by the Angus Reid Group, commissioned by Cardus, outlines the many caveats and concerns Canadians express about the breadth and speed of the expansion of MAiD.

Response to NDP Plan for Long-Term Care
Response to NDP Plan for Long-Term Care
2020-11-05T05:00:24

There is broad consensus that action is desperately needed in the long-term care system. 

,
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9