Our Research

Work is About More Than Money
REPORT December 17th

There is a large hole in our public talk about work and wages. Reviewing the latest research, "Work is About More Than Money" uncovers the personal, social and psychological costs of unemployment. It identifies the missing pieces in our thinking and policymaking about labour to show why it is urgent to attend to the non-monetary benefits of work.

People Over Paperwork
REPORT November 12th

Workers in Ontario’s long-term care homes provide care and support for thousands of seniors every day—but there are not nearly enough of them. 

The demand for long-term care beds is rising, yet care workers' wages have fallen. Increased regulation, meanwhile, is forcing these workers to spend more time filling out paperwork, taking time away from hands-on care for residents. 

This report examines the labour market challenges facing Ontario's long-term care workers and urges government to join long-term care employers and labour in implementing solutions.

Making the Public-Good Case for Private Schools
REPORT October 31st

This panel discussion with Ashley Berner, Derrell Bradford, and Ray Pennings proposes ideas and innovations to redefine public education. Held in Washington, D.C. in 2019, it explores the findings of nearly ten years of research into education outcomes through the Cardus Education Survey.

Who Are You? Reaffirming Human Dignity
REPORT October 28th

“Know thyself.” 

This ancient Greek maxim is popular today, but also widely misunderstood. Self knowledge goes deeper than awareness of your likes, dislikes, and personal interests. To know who you are, is to know what you are. 

What kind of being am I? What does it mean to be human? Do I have dignity? Who Are You? Reaffirming Human Dignity from the Cardus Religious Freedom Institute will help you answer these questions.  

Cardus Education Survey 2018: Rethinking Public Education
REPORT October 7th

The United States is ready for a more inclusive definition of public education. Based on a decade’s worth of research, Rethinking Public Education: Including All Schools that Contribute to the Public Good, argues that private schools contribute to American public education in tangible and measurable ways. Read on to learn why a modern, inclusive, and pluralistic public education system would take those contributions into account and include all types of schools – public and private.

Cardus Education Survey 2018: Perceptions of High School Experience and Preparedness for Life
REPORT September 19th

This report from the 2018 Cardus Education Survey examines the school sector effect on how graduates of nongovernmental and public schools in the U.S think about their experiences in high school, including an assessment of their high school’s quality and climate, the relationships they formed there, and how well they felt prepared for key dimensions of adulthood, including university, career, and personal relationships. It is based on a representative survey of 1500 randomly selected American high school graduates (ages 24-39). The Cardus Education Survey includes a large number of controls for many factors in student development such as parental education, religion, and income, to isolate a school sector's particular impact. 

Who Chooses Ontario Independent Schools and Why? (Summary)
REPORT September 9th

Ontario's independent school sector is growing at a remarkable pace. Who chooses independent schools in Ontario and why? What is the demographic profile of families who are choosing independent schools? What are the reasons behind their choices? This is the first study in over a decade to answer those questions. 

To read the full report, click here.

Who Chooses Ontario Independent Schools and Why?
REPORT September 9th

Ontario's independent school sector is growing at a remarkable pace. Who chooses independent schools in Ontario and why? What is the demographic profile of families who are choosing independent schools? What are the reasons behind their choices? This is the first study in over a decade to answer those questions. 

To read a summary of the report, click here.

To check out the British Columbia findings, click here.

To check out the Alberta findings, click here.

Creating Equitable Child Care Policy for Alberta
REPORT September 5th

Parents in Alberta rely on diverse care options for their children. Policy-makers should respect the needs and choices of parents by continuing to focus on child care policies that are equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose.

Recent Statistics Canada data show that parents depend on diverse forms of care to best meet the needs of their family. This includes the 46 percent of parents in Alberta with children under six who do not use non-parental care. However, funding is primarily directed to centre-based care. How can the Alberta government include all families in its child care policy? 

Creating Equitable Child Care Policy for British Columbia
REPORT September 5th

Parents in British Columbia rely on diverse care options for their children. Policy-makers should respect the needs and choices of parents by continuing to focus on child care policies that are equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose.

Recent Statistics Canada data show that parents depend on diverse forms of care to best meet the needs of their family. This includes the 42 percent of parents in BC with children under six who do not use non-parental care. However, funding is primarily directed to centre-based care. How can the BC government include all families in its child care policy?