Week of October 26, 2008

 
October 31 st 2008

Comment editor Gideon Strauss will deliver the keynote at Cardus' Hamilton relaunch event, next week Wednesday night (Nov. 5), 7:15 pm at Redeemer University, Ancaster, Ontario. His lecture is called Personal Change and Public Faithfulness:

What does it mean to respond to faith personally and publicly? In this talk, Gideon will present a subjective and autobiographical reflection on this question, with an emphasis on how a personal commitment translates into public engagement for the common good. What does it mean for our engagement in the arts, the academy, business, technology, politics and city life?

Cardus is presenting a complimentary evening—complete with hors-d'oeuvres reception in Redeemer's art gallery, followed by an intimate discussion in the auditorium. We would love to host you there. Will you consider attending and staying connected to our unique organization?

Click here for more details, or register (complimentary) here: https://www.cardus.ca/store/699/.

. . . Did It Start With A Bang? Science, Religion, and the Creation of the Universe is a free public lecture to be held at Saint Paul University in Ottawa, Ontario. Dr. Michael Heller, winner of the 2008 Templeton Prize for his original research into the origin of the universe, will deliver the keynore. Friday, November 7, 2008 at 7 pm. More details: www.augustinecollege.org or (613)237-9870.

. . . Roland Hoksbergen, professor of economics at Calvin College, will speak on Navigating through the Storm: Christian Faith and the Financial Crisis at Redeemer University College in Ancaster, Ontario on Thursday, November 13, 2008, 7:00-8:30 AM over breakfast. $10 tickets for the breakfast are available from Syd Hielema: shielema@redeemer.ca.

. . . Tomorrow, Comment favourite Sam Kho curates a one-evening exhibition, "considering art-collecting a form of activism." From the promo for Electorial Decisions: "Any citizen's idea of the next President leading the nation is likely to be as ambivalent as art choices he or she collects. As voters across the country contemplate the coming week’s elections and the larger future, ELECTORAL DECISIONS, presented by 100 Stewards, exhibits odds and ends (mostly odds) from the collection of one independent curator." Costumes, particularly of political figures, are welcome though not mandatory.

. . . Finally, Comment recommends "How and Why to Support Religion Overseas" by Scott Thomas (University of Bath). Thomas argues for the importance of a new understanding of religion in international affairs, and how a renewed perspective on global religion can refresh perspectives on foreign and international policy. This piece might serve as a good introduction to a broader body of literature for interested readers—including Thomas' recent book, The Global Resurgence of Religion and the Transformation of International Relations: The Struggle for the Soul of the Twenty-First Century (Palgrave, 2005), or another fine journal the Comment team regularly enjoys, The Review for Faith and International Affairs.