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Child Care During the Pandemic: British Columbia
Child Care During the Pandemic: British Columbia
2020-09-08T06:00:52

From the beginning of the pandemic in British Columbia, child care was declared an essential service. Providers were not ordered to close but were also not forced to stay open. According to various child-care providers, the pandemic did not so much create problems as exacerbate existing challenges. Diverse forms of child care were available to families during the pandemic, but the crisis highlights the province’s inequitable treatment of providers based on the type of care they provide.

Child Care in Post-Pandemic Canada
Child Care in Post-Pandemic Canada
2020-09-08T06:00:12

We argue that the following three principles should undergird child-care policy in post-pandemic Canada: Place the well-being of the child first; recognize families’ diverse situations and needs; provide funding that all families can access equitably, and embed it in a comprehensive and flexible family policy.

Read the B.C. case study

Read the Ontario case study

The Canadian Marriage Map
The Canadian Marriage Map
2020-06-23T12:00:46

A compilation of data on marriage

Creating Equitable Child Care Policy for Alberta
Creating Equitable Child Care Policy for Alberta
2019-09-05T11:00:57

Parents in Alberta rely on diverse care options for their children. Policy-makers should respect the needs and choices of parents by continuing to focus on child care policies that are equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose.

Recent Statistics Canada data show that parents depend on diverse forms of care to best meet the needs of their family. This includes the 46 percent of parents in Alberta with children under six who do not use non-parental care. However, funding is primarily directed to centre-based care. How can the Alberta government include all families in its child care policy? 

Creating Equitable Child Care Policy for British Columbia
Creating Equitable Child Care Policy for British Columbia
2019-09-05T10:00:48

Parents in British Columbia rely on diverse care options for their children. Policy-makers should respect the needs and choices of parents by continuing to focus on child care policies that are equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose.

Recent Statistics Canada data show that parents depend on diverse forms of care to best meet the needs of their family. This includes the 42 percent of parents in BC with children under six who do not use non-parental care. However, funding is primarily directed to centre-based care. How can the BC government include all families in its child care policy? 

Creating Equitable Child Care Policy for Ontario
Creating Equitable Child Care Policy for Ontario
2019-09-05T09:00:14

Ontario parents rely on diverse care options for their children. Policy-makers should respect the needs and choices of parents by continuing to focus on child care policies that are equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose.

Recent Statistics Canada data show that parents depend on diverse forms of care to best meet the needs of their family. This includes the 46 percent of parents in Ontario with children under six who do not use non-parental care. However, funding is primarily directed to centre-based care. How can the Ontario government include all families in its child care policy? 

Creating Equitable Child Care Policy for Canada
Creating Equitable Child Care Policy for Canada
2019-09-05T08:00:35

Canadian parents rely on diverse care options for their children. Federal policy-makers can develop a narrative that encourages child care policies that are equitable for all families.

Recent Statistics Canada data show that parents depend on diverse forms of care to best meet the needs of their family. This includes the 40 percent of parents with children under six who do not use non-parental care. However, funding is primarily directed to centre-based care. How can the federal government include all families in its child care policy?

Women's Happiness, Women's Health
Women's Happiness, Women's Health
2019-03-04T17:00:55

This paper marks International Women's Day 2019 by asking whether it is possible to be both pro-woman and pro-life.  

It highlights the diverse voices and views of early feminist leaders like Mattie Brinkerhoff and Victoria Woodhull to discuss the various kinds of "feminisms" that have existed over time, and the diverse claims they have made regarding abortion. Drawn from a speech given to the deVeber Institute, Andrea Mrozek challenges both pro-life leaders and feminist leaders to broaden their tents, remember their roots, and renew the conversation about how best to advance women's happiness and women's health.

Joint Letter Requesting Federal Reinstatement of Marriage and Divorce Rate Data
Joint Letter Requesting Federal Reinstatement of Marriage and Divorce Rate Data
2019-01-25T16:09:00

On Jan 25, 2019 a letter with 31 signatories went to the federal government asking for the reinstatement of the collection of marriage and divorce rate statistics. Since that time, additional signatories have added their names requesting the reinstatement of this valuable data.

A Positive Vision for Child Care Policy Across Canada
A Positive Vision for Child Care Policy Across Canada
2019-01-21T12:00:55

Avoiding the social and economic pitfalls of "universal" child care.

Please Say Yes? Why Marriage Should Be Included in Modern Sexuality Education Curricula
Please Say Yes? Why Marriage Should Be Included in Modern Sexuality Education Curricula
2018-12-06T09:00:11

Is marriage going out of style? The statistics suggest yes. What hasn't gone out of style, however, is love and relationships. When it comes to teaching healthy relationships to youth, marriage is the highest standard for consensually entered, safe relationship.

This paper outlines why marriage should be included in modern sexuality education curricula in Ontario and across Canada.

Living La Vida Lonely
Living La Vida Lonely
2018-11-12T16:39:40

Has the growth of online dating services and apps made finding a suitable partner easier?  The evidence suggests that fewer Canadian young adults are in marriages and cohabiting partnerships than in the past. In short, young people today are more likely to be on their own.

Parent-free Nation?
Parent-free Nation?
2018-10-16T13:00:51

If children are doing poorly—parents need to be part of the solution

Why is Sex Ed Silent About Marriage?
Why is Sex Ed Silent About Marriage?
2018-09-05T15:00:31

Meet Ontario’s new old sex ed, same as Ontario’s old new sex ed, writes Cardus Family Director Andrea Mrozek. Meanwhile, Mrozek notes, the proven, enduring good of marriage gets crickets.

“A child born of a three-way” and Newfoundland law
“A child born of a three-way” and Newfoundland law
2018-07-10T11:23:45

In a decision delivered in April 2018, a Newfoundland court recognized three legal parents (two fathers and one mother), based on the throuple’s sexual relationship 

Cohabitation Among Middle-Aged Canadians
Cohabitation Among Middle-Aged Canadians
2018-06-20T16:00:37

A new report finds that marriage is declining as cohabitation rates double among middle-aged Canadians.

Social Assistance and Marital Decision-Making in Canada
Social Assistance and Marital Decision-Making in Canada
2018-04-03T00:00:00

What is the relationship between marital status and social-assistance participation? Canadian analysis on how social-assistance policies may discourage marriage provides mixed results. However it shows that regional variations such as labour market conditions and wage growth are important considerations when exploring social-assistance participation and marital decision-making.

New Census Data Shows Fewer Children Living With Married Parents: Provincial and Territorial Breakdown
New Census Data Shows Fewer Children Living With Married Parents: Provincial and Territorial Breakdown
2018-03-22T00:00:00

This provincial and territorial breakdown of the 2016 family census data shows that kids in Canada’s wealthiest provinces are the most likely to be growing up in families with two married parents.

New Census Data Shows Fewer Children Living With Married Parents: National Breakdown
New Census Data Shows Fewer Children Living With Married Parents: National Breakdown
2018-02-14T00:00:00

This national and historic breakdown of the 2016 family census data examines how, for the first time since 1981, Census 2016 omitted the distinction between married and cohabiting parents with regards to children’s living arrangements. Cardus Family made a special request for this data and offers several reasons why we ought to return to distinguishing between marriage and cohabitation with every census release.

Six Ways to Maintain Attachment When Using Daycare
Six Ways to Maintain Attachment When Using Daycare
2017-10-25T00:00:00

Libby Simon, MSW, discusses the importance of avoiding peer orientation for kids in daycare.

Missing Family Dynamics
Missing Family Dynamics
2017-09-11T00:00:00

Dr. Mark Milke considers the role of family factors in changing rates of poverty and inequality, for the first time in Canada. The data show that the family form with the highest income level (two parents with children) diminished from 71.6 percent of families in 1976 to just 49.8 percent of families in 2014. Family fracturing appears to correlate with changing inequality levels. If we seek solutions to the problems of inequality and poverty, understanding the family angle matters.

The Daycare Lobby's Misogyny
The Daycare Lobby's Misogyny
2017-08-31T00:00:00

The International Monetary Fund recently wrote of coercing Canadian mothers into the workforce. Dr. Chris Sarlo reflected on economic implications here

. Today we learn how Canadian academics and lobbyists have long been making precisely the same wrongheaded point.

Building Instability
Building Instability
2017-08-03T00:00:00

The new 2016 Census family data has been released. This new information will help us understand how marriage, divorce, cohabitation, and many other indicators are faring in our country. Data comparison with years gone by is more difficult this year, given the way in which Statistics Canada is presenting the data. In many instances, the disparate family forms of cohabitation and marriage are lumped together.

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