Convivium

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Convivium runs few ads, and does not seek profit on memberships. Rather, our mission—words and deeds for the common good—is only possible when visionaries make it possible. We need patrons. Will you support us?

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Religious faith is critical to our Canadian common life. Join The Convivium Project as we take faith seriously, advancing conversations that make room for religion.

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Religious faith is critical to our Canadian common life. Show your children and loved ones that a faithful citizen is not a contradiction in terms—get them into The Convivium Project.

Volume 1, No. 3 Volume 1, No. 3 Our current issue's look back at World Youth Day 2002 is more than just a nostalgic remembrance of what was. It is a call to what the polis, the shared space of the city, can be when faith in our common life is the operating principle.

From July 23 to 28, 2002, the city of Toronto was transformed by hundreds of thousands of young people—Catholics, yes, but also children of many faiths—from around the world. As Mel Lastman, mayor of Toronto at the time, tells us in his inimitable way, many Torontonians initially feared that the youth would be pests. They ended by following the kids into coffee shops to hear them sing, to experience the love they generated. The polis was made vibrant in a way its inhabitants could never have imagined.

Welcome to the third full issue of Convivium—available only by membership in the community.
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Volume 1, No. 4 Volume 1, No. 4

In this issue of Convivium, Father Raymond J. de Souza unmasks Lance Armstrong and the cult of smiley-face nihilism. Douglas Farrow details why Canadians must ask the God question for the nation's sake. Deborah Gyapong finds healing treasure in spiritual wounding. Cardus research director Ray Pennings discusses the public interest in private education. And John Zucchi tells parents why children need Mystery more than instruction.

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Volume 2, No. 5 Volume 2, No. 5 My journalistic hero G.K. Chesterton described giving thanks as "the highest form of thought" and gratitude as "happiness doubled by wonder." As Convivium celebrates its first birthday with this issue, we have the happy double wonder of having not one but two pieces on the immortal Edwardian in our pages.
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Volume 2, No. 10 Volume 2, No. 10
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Volume 1, No. 2 Volume 1, No. 2 "Raymond, if you want to advance an idea, write a book," Father Richard John Neuhaus told me one December evening. "But if you want to change a culture, you need a magazine. Because magazines are literally periodical, they create an ongoing community—readers, writers, editors, benefactors. And only communities can change cultures."

Father Neuhaus knew that to change a culture, you need to propose another culture, and cultures are not singular ideas but the shared life of a community of persons. It has always been thus. In ancient times, it was not only the truth of the Gospel that attracted but the witness of the early Christian communities. In our time, the means of modern communications allow us to create communities across distance through shared ideas, engaged arguments and, as Father Neuhaus taught us better than most, convivial good cheer.

Welcome to the second full issue of Convivium—available only by membership in the community.
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Volume 1, No. 5 Volume 1, No. 5 Shared laughter of comrades who've been through stiff weather together: what a definition of community in 10 small words.

In this issue of Convivium, Paul Henderson tells us why prayer, not hockey pucks, is the real goal of his life. The differing deaths of her parents helped Richelle Wiseman grasp why it matters how we die. Writer Alan Hustak reflects on Christmas in Saskatchewan. Theologian Jason Zuidema notes in the second part of his series on religious communities in Canada that memory itself is notoriously fallible. And Buddhist, writer, teacher and environmental activist Trevor Carolan recalls a moment in the 1990s when a multifaith coalition came together organically to protest offensive anti-Christian art.
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Volume 2, No. 11 Volume 2, No. 11
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Volume 2, No. 9 Volume 2, No. 9

“Life often, simply, requires us to be brave.” Yes. It does. Yet simply required bravery seems to me a response almost entirely overlooked in the wide world that spreads outside my window these days. Bravery, though, is something else. It is something daily, if not momentary. And it is something simply required by the lives we are actually living. Writing in this issue of Convivium shows us, I think, why we should love it much more than heroism as defined above.

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Donation - Convivium Donation - Convivium

Your donations, in addition to the basic membership fee, are greatly appreciated to help sustain this project. Donations of $200 or more include a complimentary membership and are entirely tax receiptable..

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Volume 2, No. 7 Volume 2, No. 7
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Volume 2, No. 8 Volume 2, No. 8
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Preview Issue Preview Issue

"The truth of the Gospel is not something to be consumed or used superficially; rather it is a gift that calls for a free response. Even when it is proclaimed in the virtual space of the Web, the Gospel demands to be incarnated in the real world and linked to the real faces of our brothers and sisters, those with whom we share our daily lives!"


Those sentences are marching orders for the Cardus Convivium Project, one part of which you hold in the form of Convivium magazine. Those involved with the project, which will unfold in various ways over the coming months and years, consider it our attempt to provide a measure of that "daily nourishment" in ways we believe have been lacking in Canada for a long time.

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Premiere Issue Premiere Issue Listening is the antithesis of the kind of journalism Christopher Hitchens practised late in life. Listening is what puts things in context, according to Rex Murphy. Listening—observing—leads to memories like those written here by Senator Hugh Segal, or shown here in the photographs of Christophe Potworowski.

Listening is also key to convival existence, that is, to faith in our common life.

Welcome to the premiere issue of Convivium—available by membership in the community.
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