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For Love or Money?
For Love or Money?
2021-10-21T06:00:00

Why do some young adults choose to marry and others do not?

Missing Marriage and the Baby Carriage
Missing Marriage and the Baby Carriage
2021-06-23T13:43:27

A Cardus research brief highlighting unpartnered young adults and the decline of fertility in Canada.

Look Before You Leap: The Real Costs and Complexities of National Daycare
Look Before You Leap: The Real Costs and Complexities of National Daycare
2021-05-06T05:00:00

The federal budget of 2021 offers national daycare at a cost of $30 billion over five years, with an annual cost of $9.2 billion after that. This sounds like a lot of funding, but is it enough?

This research report offers a detailed assessment of the real cost of national daycare and the amounts that provincial governments will realistically be responsible for contributing once the federal funding is spent.

Family Policy Brief
Family Policy Brief
2021-04-07T15:09:32

Strong, stable families are irreplaceable and are foundational to a healthy society. Good family policy can also enhance family well-being by addressing the diverse needs of families and their most vulnerable members, children.

Child Care by the Numbers - Canada
Child Care by the Numbers - Canada
2021-02-12T17:00:00

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of Canadian parents and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Is Quebec a model of high-quality, affordable care?
Is Quebec a model of high-quality, affordable care?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? The pertinent question is if Quebec offers a model of high-quality, affordable care?

Does the Quebec model help parents?
Does the Quebec model help parents?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, does the Quebec model help parents?

Should the federal government introduce a new child-care model?
Should the federal government introduce a new child-care model?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, Should the federal government introduce a new child-care model? 

Cash benefits for families and a national daycare system?
Cash benefits for families and a national daycare system?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, can we have both cash benefits for families and a national daycare system?

Will a “universal” early-learning and child-care system get mothers back to work?
Will a “universal” early-learning and child-care system get mothers back to work?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, will a “universal” early-learning and child-care system get mothers back to waged work after the pandemic? 

Do those who oppose a national daycare system also oppose working mothers?
Do those who oppose a national daycare system also oppose working mothers?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, do those who oppose a national daycare system also oppose working mothers? 

Does Nobel Prize–winning economist James Heckman support universal daycare?
Does Nobel Prize–winning economist James Heckman support universal daycare?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? Another question that begs to be answered is if Nobel Prize–winning economist James Heckman supports universal daycare? 

Do we have a credible cost estimate for a national, high-quality universal daycare system?
Do we have a credible cost estimate for a national, high-quality universal daycare system?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, do we have a credible cost estimate for a national, high-quality universal daycare system?  

Would spending 1 percent of GDP on child care achieve a national, high-quality daycare system?
Would spending 1 percent of GDP on child care achieve a national, high-quality daycare system?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, would spending 1 percent of GDP on child care achieve a national, high-quality daycare system?

Is there a shortage of child care in Canada?
Is there a shortage of child care in Canada?
2021-01-28T09:00:00

Since the start of the pandemic, calls for universal child care have picked up steam.   Before pursuing this policy approach, however, there are important questions to answer. These questions pertain to all aspects of child care—accessibility, quality, and cost. Every family is different, and child care needs and desires vary. Will a federally funded, universal system be able to meet these needs? More importantly, is there a shortage of child care in Canada? 

Child Care by the Numbers: Alberta
Child Care by the Numbers: Alberta
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of Alberta parents and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Child Care by the Numbers - British Columbia
Child Care by the Numbers - British Columbia
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of BC parents and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Childcare by the Numbers - Manitoba
Childcare by the Numbers - Manitoba
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of parents in Manitoba and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Child Care by the Numbers-Saskatchewan
Child Care by the Numbers-Saskatchewan
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of parents in Saskatchewan and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Child Care by the Numbers-Prince Edward Island
Child Care by the Numbers-Prince Edward Island
2021-01-28T08:00:00

Child care is the care of a child, no matter who provides that care. Families have diverse care needs and rely on a variety of forms of care to meet those needs. Public policy best serves families when it offers flexibility and choice. Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of parents in Prince Edward Island and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Child Care by the Numbers - Ontario
Child Care by the Numbers - Ontario
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of parents in Ontario and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Child Care by the Numbers - Newfoundland & Labrador
Child Care by the Numbers - Newfoundland & Labrador
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of parents in Newfoundland and Labrador and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Child Care by the Numbers - Nova Scotia
Child Care by the Numbers - Nova Scotia
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of Nova Scotia parents and their reasons for the type of care they choose.

Child Care by the Numbers - New Brunswick
Child Care by the Numbers - New Brunswick
2021-01-28T08:00:00

The federal government intends to implement a national universal child-care program that will require the provinces to exchange autonomy for funding directed toward a one-size-fits-all system. A national universal child-care program is structurally opposed to equity for all families, because it limits funding based on the type of care families use. There are better options.

Child-care policies should be equitable for all families, regardless of the type of care they choose. Universal child-care systems fail to recognize the diverse care needs of New Brunswick parents and their reasons for the type of care they choose.



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